Ferrite Materials: Ferrite Cores

Magnetics® soft ferrite cores are an oxide made from Iron (Fe), Manganese (Mn), and Zinc (Zn) which are commonly referred to as manganese zinc ferrites. They have a low coercivity and are also known as soft magnetic ferrites. Because of their comparatively low losses at high frequencies, they are extensively used in switched-mode power supply (SMPS) and radio frequency (RF) transformers and inductors. Ferrite cores for the high frequency power supply and high quality communication markets are produced in a variety of shapes and sizes for inductors, pulse transformers, high frequency transformers, and noise filters. Notable characteristics of Magnetics ferrite materials are high permeability, good temperature properties, and low disaccommodation. Magnetics offers ten materials. The materials range in permeability from 900µ to 10,000µ and are available in a variety of geometries including toroidsshapes and pot cores. Hardware accessories such as bobbins, printed circuit bobbins, clamps, mounts and headers are also available.

Learn More

Ferrite materials summary for all Magnetics power and high permeability ferrite materials. See individual material curves:   

Power Design with Ferrite Cores for inductors and transformers.

Gapped Ferrite Cores, how to determine gapped code for Magnetics ferrites when gapping for depth of grind, or gapping for AL values. 

Low Level Design with Ferrite Pot Cores featuring magnetic data, temperature characteristics, core dimensions, accessories and other key design criteria for linear inductors for high frequency LC tuned circuits. 

Designing with Magnetic Cores at High Temperatures

Ferrite Applications

Applications Desired Properties Preferred Materials Available Shapes
Broadband Transformers

Low loss, High µ (permeability), Good frequency response

J, W Pot cores, Toroids, E, U & I cores, RM, EP cores
Common Mode Chokes Very high µ J, W Toroids, E cores
Converter and Inverter Transformers Low losses, High saturation F, L, P, R, T Toroids, E, U & I cores, Pot cores, RS cores, Planar cores
Differential Mode Inductors Low losses, High temperature stability, Good stability across load conditions F, P, R, T Gapped pot cores, EP cores, E cores, RM cores, Planar cores, PQ cores
Narrow Band Transformers Moderate Q, High µ, High stability F, J Pot cores, Toroids, RM cores, EP cores
Noise Filters High µ, Good frequency response J, W Toroids
Power Inductors Low losses at high flux densities and temperatures, High saturation, Good stability across load conditions F, L, P, R Pot cores, E cores, PQ cores, RM cores, Planar cores
Power Transformers High µ and low losses at high flux densities and temperatures, High saturation, Low exciting currents F, L, P, R, T Ungapped pot cores, E, U & I cores, Toroids, EP cores, RS cores, DS cores, PQ cores, Planar cores
Pulse Transformers High µ, Low loss, High B saturation J, W Toroids
Telecom Inductors Low losses, High temperature stability, Good stability across load conditions F, P, R, T Pot cores, EP cores, E cores, RM cores, Planar cores

Ferrite Core Comparative Geometry Considerations

 

Toroid Core E Core EC, ETD, EER Cores ER, Planar Cores  PQ Cores Pot Core DS, RM Cores EP Core
Core Cost • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Bobbin Cost N/A • • N/A • • • • • •
Winding Cost • • •
Winding Flexibility • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Assembly Difficulty • • • • • • • •
Mounting Flexibility • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Heat Dissipation • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Shielding • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Table Key

Lowest cost and/or Worst choice
• • Medium cost and/or Medium choice
• • • Highest cost and/or Best choice